Is women’s bespoke clothing poor quality

Is women’s bespoke clothing poor quality

My answer to whether women’s bespoke clothing is poorly made is – not in the slightest at all! In fact, it’s the complete opposite of what people think.

Did you know when clothing is made in mass-produced factories its passed through several fast production lines which mean a certain amount of garments have to be made in a particular time

Where is the love and care in that?

There will be a machinist for the body of the garment, a machinist for the zips, a machinist for the sleeves and so on and they don’t focus on the size it’s just how many they can get made in a day.

This is where to believe the problem can occur because with them having to get so many numbers of items made in a day mistakes happen = garments not fitting properly.

Have you ever been to try something on and size doesn’t fit but them you try another size and it fits… well this is because it’s not made by the same person and care hasn’t gone into the making of the garment.

But it plays with your mindset doesn’t it,  I defiantly have for me I’ve gone to try things on and come away feeling not very confident and bit disheartened about the whole shopping experience.

Why should I choose bespoke clothing then?

When you choose to go bespoke not only do you get care and attention going into the item but it is also made to you exact measurements. 

That means when trying something on you come away feeling incredible and a hell of a lot more confident, I can guarantee you on that one. 

When working with me 1:1 that is exactly what my main priority is: confidence.

It’s all in mindset when it comes to clothing and I believe confidence plays a big part. I love to tap into your personality and really get you to connect with who you are.

Confidence in clothing is everything — own that shit.

This is where I can eliminate the fear of clothing being made poorly as well because not only do you get to create a rocking leather jacket or piece of clothing you get to be apart of the journey too, you get to see how its made.

This also relates to my previous blog post about 5 myths about handmade clothing

Ready to own your own piece of bespoke clothing? Drop me a message and let’s chat.

Bespoke Clothing – Is It expensive

Bespoke Clothing – Is It expensive

 

Bespoke Clothing

When it comes to the word bespoke or handmade it sounds expensive right?

And yes it might seem that when first enquiring but hear me out when you sit and think about how much you spend on fast fashion that doesn’t last then in the long run it actually works out a lot less in money.

Why?

  • its made to last a lifetime
  • Its made with care
  • Its made sustainably
  • Its made for you! 

I believe you have to look at it from a mindset view, when you decide to go bespoke you will probably look after the item of clothing and enjoy wearing it so much more than what you would spending on something that you just buy for the sake of buying.

When it comes to bespoke clothing its an investment piece that is made to fit you so it will not only will it make you feel incredible, it will also last a lifetime.

The biggest cost usually when comes to a handmade outfit is the fabric but I believe if you use high quality fabrics then the end result will be high quality.

So what happens in a bespoke service?

 

I love to know everything you want from an outfit from your personality to the shapes you desire and style you are going for, I can then take that information and see what would work out best for you.

I work with sketches and fabric samples of your choice as a starting point to create your unique garment.

Working one to one with me is an incredible journey too because not only will you see how the construction of a garment comes together it will be to your exact measurements and that’s not something you from the high street.

Now don’t get me wrong there are some amazing companies on the high street that are turning to being more sustainable but if you are looking for a completely unique piece then I suggest you think about going bespoke-I guarantee it will be the best decision you make

In the words of Vivienne Westwood

“Buy less Choose well”

 

Fancy reading more on bespoke clothing then check out my blog on

5 myths about handmade clothing 

5 myths about handmade clothing

5 myths about handmade clothing

Im here to talk about myths around handmade clothing and what is not so true. My aim in my business is to bring you quality handmade clothing that last a lifetime and in this blog post I’m going to discuss with you just why

Would you rather buy a piece of fast fashion over and over again or a very well made item that will last a lifetime? I know which one I would choose.

Buying a piece of tailored clothing is a daunting thought especially when you hear such things like:

  • its not well made — poor quality
  • Oh it will just fall apart
  • Its old fashioned
  • Its too expensive

So let’s dive into it.

5 myths about handmade clothing

1. Handmade garments are unfashionable

Wrong! I know it can seem like handmade clothing is just for grandmas who use the kitchen curtains to make a dress or mums who make up the duvet into costume for a school Christmas play… we’ve all been there yeah? I remember having a sheet wrapped around me for an angel in the nativity but enough about that.

Within my designs they are no way unfashionable, I research the latest trends, keep up to date with the latest colours and fabrics. In fact being sustainable and thrifty is the new trend so getting something handmade — you are bang on trend!

 

5 myths about handmade clothing

2. Handmade clothing is too expensive

Yes, it may seem that when first enquiring but if you sit and think abut how much you spend on fast fashion that doesn’t last then in the long run it actually works out a lot less in money.

When it comes to bespoke clothing its an investment piece that is made to fit you so it will not only make you feel incredible, it will also last a lifetime.

When you look at it from a mindset point of view you will probably look after it and enjoy wearing it more than what you would spending on something that you just buy for the sake of buying.

 

5 myths about handmade clothing

3. Hand made clothing is poor quality.

This is one for the mindset again because when you think of handmade you automatically think its going to fall apart because its not bought from a proper shop or it doesn’t have the label on it.

When in actual fact it’s made so much better. Everything in my studio is made from scratch not mass produced so from the cutting out to the sewing up its all checked over by me in which I make sure its made to the highest quality.

When In mass produced factories its passed through several fast production lines which mean a certain amount of garments have to be made in a certain time — where’s the love in that?

 

5 myths about handmade clothing

4. But you can’t send handmade clothing back

My business is based on made to order, personalised and bespoke clothing.

By law my made to order items I do accept returns for faulty reasons and simply if you change your mind.

My exception on bespoke and personalised I can accept returns on the bases on faulty or not as described. However If you do have a problem I always try to find a solution for you especially when it comes to the fit of the garment.

 

5 myths about handmade clothing

5. Handmade clothing is just for special occasions.

Bridal wear and evening wear are special occasions and people feel like these are the only times you should get something handmade.

But I disagree with this I think everyday is a special occasion, if you want to feel confident in what you wear and something that lets your personality shine through then having a piece of handmade clothing is the way to go.

Imagine opening up you wardrobe and seeing something that represents you and you feel excited to wear it — then I don’t have to say anymore.

I definitely think handmade clothing is coming back in a big way, especially when the fashion industry is the biggest threat to climate change. Making a change and buying less choosing well is the way forward.

If you are interested in having coming made by Born to Thread then check out my bespoke clothing service.

 

5 myths about handmade clothing

The difference between Bespoke and Couture – What I offer in my services.

The difference between Bespoke and Couture – What I offer in my services.

First of all, I want to explain to you the difference between bespoke and couture.

The two are similar and can be classed as ‘made to order’  with custom measurements. They both suggest high-quality materials with quality construction.

“Bespoke” is English and means ‘made to order’ mainly from the customer’s measurements and alterations to the customers taste. Customers choose the fabric and the design and very much have their personal input into the whole process. 

A bespoke garment is usually constructed mainly be a machine but still has the integrity of high-quality materials, design and construction, but would not be considered as couture. 

“Couture”  means ‘highly handmade’ and is a French word for sewing or fashion.

About 60% of the garment is hand sewn, not by machine. This means hand-finished seams, hand-finished hems and possible hand-beading or other embroideries.  

“Haute Couture” is a very specific term and only certain fashion houses are legally allowed to use the term and they all have to meet a criteria list for membership which includes: design made-to-order for private clients with fittings, have a workshop in Paris with at least fifteen ateliers, at least twenty full-time technicians on hand and present a collection of at least fifty designs twice a year.

Official top designers include: 

Chanel, Dior, Givenchy, Valentino and Jean Paul Gaultier. 

I see a lot of people throw these terms around without doing the proper research and mainly to make their work seem better, which can be very frustrating for the actual professionals out there. 

With my handy guide up above, it helps to know so it’s easy to research when you’re looking into a handmade garment. 

I pride myself at Born to Thread that everything is made in-house from my small studio in Yorkshire with a mixture of bespoke and couture. 

What does this mean? Well, the main body of my garments are made by me using a sewing machine and then the finishing off of the garment is always done by hand. 

If I was to be embellishing anything then that would be done by hand also.

Why go bespoke?

At BTT I love to capture YOUR personality through fashion which is why it makes such a special experience. 

  • It’s made to fit you, to your exact measurements.
  • It’s higher in quality, which means it last’s longer than fast fashion.
  • It’s sustainably good for the environment
  • It’s an investment piece and made with techniques and care you won’t find in the shops.
  • It’s a one-off just for you. 

It may feel a very daunting experience getting fitted for a made to measure garment, especially if you have never had one made before but I trust you it is not, in-fact its turns in to such a memorable experience and one you can remember when wearing the outfit. 

So you may be wondering now what my services entail and how long it takes.  Here is a small rundown of the process of a bespoke service. 

CONSULTATION STAGE

Born To Thread invites you to an informal free relaxed consultation at my home studio where tea and biscuits are on hand or if you live far away Zoom appointments are also available for clients that live far away.  

We will discuss your ideas on design, fit, fabrics colours and timescale to help me understand how you would like your unique garment to look and give you more of an idea of how the process will all work.

Please note Zoom appointments are only for consultations and design stage not a fitting stage. 

It’s hard to give an exact price straight away until I know a clear outlay of your idea and what fabrics you would like to use, I can then curate a guide price which can be finalised throughout the design stage

As a rough guide price bespoke garment starts at £250

If you are completely happy with what we have discussed then a 50% deposit is required. 

DESIGN AND FABRIC STAGE

From the consultation stage, I will then work closely with you on the design development of your outfit involving sketches to the ideas we have discussed also fabric samples and embellishment will be sourced to the preferred colour-ways. I strive to find the best high-quality fabrics to bring out the best in your garment. 

Another meeting will be set for us to talk over fabrics I have sourced, look over designs/modify any details and choose a final outfit. I can also send you samples and meet over another Zoom call to discuss all of this.

MAKING AND FITTING STAGE

A made to measure garment takes time with care and attention.

Working with your personal measurements a paper pattern is created from the chosen design.

Once the pattern is all ready a toile garment is made for the fitting appointment – a sample garment that is made from a plain fabric that allows me to draw in style lines and see where we need to make amendments. 

The alterations from the fitting will be then transferred to a paper pattern and also changed on the toile followed by another one to two fittings if needed. 

Depending on the alterations it will either be in the toile again or actual fabric. This will be discussed along the way. 

Once you are happy with the fit and style I will then go ahead and make/finish off your outfit, a final fitting is required to double-check over last adjustments to make sure we get a perfect fit. From this personal experience, you will see your outfit come to life with experienced techniques.

Through all of this, I will keep you regularly updated via email. 

The process of a made to measure garment can take 6 to 8 weeks (depending on the garment being made) with a final fitting required to ensure the perfect fit and finish. 

I hope this has helped to give you more of an idea into choosing bespoke, if you have any questions or want to enquire more, please contact me. 

Style me up – Handmade skirt edition

Style me up – Handmade skirt edition

Style me up Sunday

I have been thinking recently on ways to be more stainable so this year I have decided to spend less on clothing and use my skill to make outfits that I want to wear. 

This made more sense to me because I will actually get a wardrobe that I love and I will have outfits that match instead of buying random things which don’t go with anything I own! 

So I did a little poll on my Instagram to see if people would be interested in following my journey in to the items that I make and how I make them. The response was surprising and gave me the kick to actually do it. 

So first up I made a leather skirt.

There is a big trend in mini skirts (very 1960s vibe) at the mo and I love the variety that is out there. I went for a more straighter line rather than A-line as I find that suits my figure more and gives a bit of length to my short legs!  

If you’re not sure what style suits you the best thing to do is to go find skirts that you like and try them on and you will instantly see which style will flatter you. 

With all my clothing I make the patterns from scratch this way you are guaranteed a perfect fit and  its easier to make any amendments if needed. 

From this I needed three easy measurements — waist, hip and finished length of the skirt. 

I then took these measurements and applied them to guide in my pattern book. 

The pattern books I use are Winifred Aldrich Pattern Cutting. This is an old book but updated versions are available, stick with your own measurements though as standard body guides have vastly changed since this book was published. 

The basic tools to use whilst pattern cutting are:
  • Dot and cross pattern paper — great guide for straight lines. 
  • Set Square or pattern master — rulers with guides and curves 
  • 2H pencil
  • Tracing wheel — to help trace the pattern out for the block that you created.
  • Tape measure 
  • paper scissors 
  • Small paper weights 

Using the instructions in the book I drew out the front and back skirt design using my measurements also remembering to add hem length on to the bottom, the skirt is usually blocked out as a half, so half of the front and half of the back — all of your measurements will be either half or quartered but the book has good guides on how to do this. 

 

When I finished my skirt pattern it looked like this

This is where you handy tracing wheel comes in, I cut out a new piece of dot and cross paper and placed it under the block that I created (front and back) I then used the wheel to trace around the front and the back so that they are two separate pieces. 

With the set square I then went over the tracing to create the outline of skirt again. This is where I added 1 cm seam allowance all the way around the skirt apart from the hem which had 2 cm on. 

I also wanted a waistband on the skirt but not a massive one so I went for a 4 cm waistband which was doubled over so finished it would be 8 cm them 1 cm seam allowance all the way around apart from the centre back and front. 

I then used this pattern to cut out in my fabric which I used a leather look fabric. I drew all around the pattern pieces with tailors chalk making sure to mark the darts ( darts help give shape to the garment and to stop it from bagging around the waist) I could then cut this out and prepare it to sew it together. 

Sewing Time 

When you come to sew leather look fabric or even real leather, the fabric doesn’t like pins and they have a bit of marking which you don’t want! 

A handy trick to use with these fabrics are small bulldog clips as they help keep the fabric together whilst you sew also another handy tool is a roller or teflon sewing foot for your machine. 

This helps it glide across stubborn fabrics. 

I decided I wanted a seam down the front and a seam down the back of the skirt for a bit for a design feature. I started by sewing in the darts on the front then on the back.

When using a leather look fabric its not advisable to iron it as it could melt but if you put your iron on low and place a pressing cloth over the top it helps just get that dart and seam a bit flatter —  not for long though 

From this I then stitched up the front pieces, then the back pieces together followed by the side seams. I could then add topstitching to the front and side seams to add more feature to skirt. 

I love a good topstitch and think it adds a bit more of a finishing touch to the garment. 

Once this was all done I added the waistband which is just a straight stitch all across the top.

Zipppppp 

I have an array of zips ranging from old and new. Some have been taken out of clothes no longer in use and some of them are vintage ones that have the original packaging. I absolutely love vintage sewing packaging. 

I used pink metal zip and made it exposed so it shows the teeth to give the skirt another feature and a little pop of colour to the back. I could then finish off the back of the skirt and add the topstitching down the bottom half just under the zip. I did the same effect to match the front. 

Home stretch….

The skirt is nearly finished. The waistband was folded over to the finish 4 cm, I then folded it in on the inside of the skirt 1 cm and stitched all the way around to give a finished neat effect on the inside.

I then topstitched around the bottom and the top of the waistband to add more detailing it also tied in well with skirt. 

The finishing touch goes to the hem, turned up 2 cm and stitched all the way round. 

Wallah one skirt already to wear. 

The styling bit.

I mean whats not good about choosing what to wear when you’ve made something. A mini skirt is such a easy thing to wear you can either keep it casual for day wear think comfy tee, over sized jumper and splash of colour for the tight or you can dress it up for going out out think a cute shirt tucked in, suit jacket or any jacket would go well and a pair of cute ankle boots to finish off the look. 

For me I went for the comfy day wear to show you how easy it is. I kept it clean and stylish, I popped on a white tee which was a small mans t-shirt I found but I loved the graphics on it. Im not keen on high necklines as they don’t seem to suit me so I chopped off the neck and it made it wider. I also cut up the sleeve and just caught the bottom back together so it created a slit effect in the sleeve. 

You don’t have to keep t-shirts the same you can alter them to any way you want. 

 

I’m a big fan of Calzedonia which is an Italian company and their tights are so good. When I was in Portugal I found this awesome pair that had a shiny line down the back of them. They went really well with the skirt keeping it quite monochrome.

Talking of monochrome I love a bit of dogtooth print yes it might seem a bit grandma-ish but get it in the right item and your winning, It also looks really cool on. 

A few years back I made myself a winter coat using Linton Tweed in a dogtooth check print. It has been an absolute fav of mine ever since I made it and it’s a timeless classic so it goes with anything and will last a lifetime.

You can read how I made it here 

I though this was very fitting to go with this outfit on blustery day, I felt stylish but comfy. 

I strapped on a pair of leopard Vans (the perfect choice) and I was ready to go. 

Real leather bag was also made by me and is available to buy from my shop. 

Have you made your self or thinking about making clothes? I’d love to hear your comments.